Category Archives: Macdonald Kelce Library

Farewell and Happy Retirement to Art Bagley

by Jeanne Vince, Collection Development Librarian

Art Bagley in Special Collections, Macdonald-Kelce Library

Bye-bye to our favorite Special Collections and Reference Librarian, Art Bagley, who has been with us for over 31 years!  He has worked diligently to archive and preserve material representing the history of The University of Tampa and, along with The Plant Museum, has secured materials highlighting many events here.  During his time at UT, Art has accomplished many things for the benefit of the Macdonald-Kelce Library. Working alongside ROTC, Art developed the Florida Military Collection, a collection of books and materials on war and military history. He has also worked on many projects with the Tampa Bay History Center.  Art has brought integrity, honesty, a love for history and humor to this place: he is a brilliant colleague and teacher.  Thank you and best wishes for a long and happy retirement!

 The following is an excerpt from The Minaret.  Posted on September 7, 2016 in Faculty & StaffFeatures:

“Art vividly remembers helping one student when he was “fresh out of library school” who asked him how many inches are in a foot. He says he took a step back and remembered that what he was taught in school – there are no unimportant questions. She needed to know. So, he found a dictionary and showed her a conversion chart. As it turned out, she was an international student from Spain who had grown up using the metric system.

Art concludes the story saying, ‘That just drove home the importance of a reference librarian and understanding the needs of the patrons.’

Art’s knowledge of UT is really what sets him apart from most other staff members. He is somewhat of the go-to person for UT and local history on campus. He can pull out information on who was here when and what dorms used to look like (many even with old photos stored in his archives). Art seems to enjoy talking about the former students and staff members he finds in his records the most. One such story is that of John “Jack” Brockman who left UT twice to go to war. The first time was for World War II and the second time for the Korean War, coming back to study in between. Shortly after his arrival in Korea, he was captured by the North Koreans and was photographed by a Red Cross representative with other prisoners. That photograph made it out of Korea and into Life Magazine, but Jackn ever did. He most likely died as a prisoner of war. ”

We will miss you Art!

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Fall 2018 Finals Library Hours

Click here for Finals Hours

Alumni reunion at the Library

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Peter Nuccio, Class of ’73 

by Laney Knight, Digital Access Librarian

The Macdonald-Kelce Library had a wonderful visit from a University of Tampa alumnus during Homecoming 2018. Sporting his minaret pin with pride, Peter Nuccio ’73 came to the reference desk on Friday afternoon to inquire after a particular item in our collection: a Richard Strauss vinyl record entitled Strauss: Also Sprach Zarathustra, Op.30 conducted by Fritz Reiner and performed by the Chicago Symphony. Nuccio explained that during his time at UT, he would often borrow this record and listen to it while he did his homework here in the library. A quick search of our catalog and stacks proved that we did still indeed have the record in question!

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Nuccio, who studied both education and philosophy, relayed to us his fondest memories of UT, describing his time here as some of the best years of his life. After graduation, he went on to be an educator and is now enjoying his retirement in Massachusetts. Despite living over 1000 miles away, Nuccio has never forgotten his alma mater and always makes a point to visit UT when he is in town. He also keeps the Spartan spirit alive by actively arranging UT alumni meetups and reunions in the northeast.

We were so glad to have met an alumnus with such fond memories of UT and our library that we gifted him the record from our collection. He now has another piece of take-home UT history he can enjoy year-round, though we hope he will come see us again the next time he is in town!

Interested in vinyl records? Search our collection on the first floor of the Macdonald-Kelce Library as well as in our online catalog.

Are you a UT alumni and have a story to share with us? Or a particular item in our collection that you enjoyed? Let us know! library@ut.edu

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UTWrites with Daniel Wollenberg 11/1

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Open Access Panel, Tuesday Oct 23, Noon

The Library is celebrating Open Access Week! Students, Staff, and Faculty are invited to attend the Library’s first Open Access Publishing panel discussion next Tuesday at noon in the Macdonald-Kelce Library room AV2. If you are interested in alternative ways of publishing your work, join in on the discussion of how open access could be beneficial to you.

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Banned Book Week, Sept. 23 – 29, 2018

square_green-300x300Year after year, we need to remind ourselves that books are still targeted for censorship by various people, groups, and institutions throughout the nation. As Librarians, we strive to make all materials available under the belief that everyone should have the freedom to read.

This year’s tagline is “Banning books silences stories.” How many books have you read or heard about in the video below? A lot of them are children’s books; maybe you read some of them in elementary school or junior high.

Stop by the exhibit in the front of the library. Here we display books in our collection that have been challenged in the recent past. You can read more about frequently challenged books by year here.  Some of them may surprise you.

Graduating? The library can help you prepare for life after college

majoring-in-the-rest-of-your-lifeJust because you are leaving UT doesn’t mean our doors are shut to you!  Did you know as Alumni, you not only have access to career services and events, you also have full onsite access to the Macdonald-Kelce Library with check out privileges? Review your benefits and sign up for an Alumni Card online.

During finals, visit us and check out the book display on the first floor that’s all about navigating life after college. We have resources on career goals, resumes, internships, and finding your path. Ask a librarian if you’d like to check out these books, or for any other career or graduate school related questions.

Alumni membership includes access to more than 275,000 books and 1,600 periodicals in-house at the Macdonald-Kelce Library. Alumni may check out 5 books at a time for a two week period. Local alums are able to Interlibrary Loan under the library’s discretion. There is no off campus access to the databases. Bring in your NAA Alumni Card to check out library books.

Good luck on your finals and congratulations to all graduates!

Can your smartphone tell if you are stressed out?

As we navigate the fine balance between technological innovation and online privacy, some companies, including Facebook, are taking the initiative to develop algorithms that point to certain behaviors. The way we use social media, these companies are investigating, could reveal real life anxieties, bouts of depression, PTSD, and other severe persistent mental illnesses.  This type of data collection and assessment of our behavior is called digital phenotyping.

Does all of this stress you out? Or do you want your tech to potentially help with your well-being?

Read the following New York Times article below and see what you think.

How Companies Scour Our Digital Lives for Clues to Our Health

An emerging field, digital phenotyping, tries to assess people’s well-being based on their interactions with digital devices.

Some books are banned from Florida State Prisons – why?

You may not be surprised to learn that the American prison system censors the types of reading materials accessible to the incarcerated.  Banned books are an unfortunate, but incessant part of American history, and occur in many institutions including public schools, libraries, bookstores, and, yes, prisons. Take a look at the New York Times article below. This article makes a case that these bans are racially motivated. Do you think having access to all books is a basic human right?

Why Are American Prisons So Afraid of This Book?

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“In the eight years since its publication, “The New Jim Crow,” a book by Michelle Alexander that explores the phenomenon of mass incarceration, has sold well over a million copies, been compared to the work of W.E.B. Du Bois, been cited in the legal decisions to end stop-and-frisk and sentencing laws, and been quoted passionately on stage at the Academy Awards.

But for the more than 130,000 adults in prison in North Carolina and Florida, the book is strictly off-limits…..read more

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Finals Hours – Fall 2017

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