Category Archives: Macdonald Kelce Library

Summer Hours

The Macdonald-Kelce Library will be open this summer during the hours of 8AM – 10PM Monday – Thursday, 11AM – 7PM on Saturday. In May, the library will close at 9PM: please check variable hours on the homepage under “Hours.”

Stay cool and happy summer!

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Finals home stretch

We know that you’re studying hard in these last few days of finals (the library has been packed!). Following the end of the semester library tradition, we’ve put out a table filled with puzzles, stress balls, and candy. Stop by if you haven’t yet to study or say hello.

Taking a May term class? If you need the library after Finals Week our hours are always posted online.

We hope you all have a happy summer and special congratulations to the graduating class of Spring 2017!

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Lost your notebook? Check the Library’s Lost & Found

The busy time of the semester is upon us! If you’re anything like us here at the library, you may find yourself a bit scatterbrained and rushed – a good recipe for misplacing your belongings. If you happen to leave your water bottle, hoodie, or any other personal item in the library, check to see if someone turned it in at our lost and found, located at the Circulation Desk.

Remember, don’t leave any valuables unattended, even when the library seems empty. You always have the option to rent out a locker if you are leaving to get a coffee or go out for lunch. Lockers are available for all day rentals, and are located near the bathrooms. Inquire at Circulation for a locker.

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UT TED Talk: Predatory Publishing, Panel Presentation

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UTWrites, Wed. March 29 with Ed Steck

Join us for a reading by poet and UT Visiting Professor Ed Steck next Wednesday at 6PM, Macdonald-Kelce Library room AV2. This UTWrites event is free and open to the public, and refreshments will be served.

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Free Speech or Hate Speech?

UPDATE: Seems like a line was drawn over the weekend. Simon & Schuster cancelled Breitbart editor Milo Yiannopoulos’ book deal, as debated below.

The following news story from about a month ago (Jan 2017) tackles the argument: do publishers, in this case Simon & Schuster, get to decide what is published despite a clear concern that the book may contain flagrant hate speech? In a university, there are policies enforcing the rights of free speech amongst students and faculty in the classroom to encourage critical nuanced debate. What do you think about the arguments brought up in this article to address this particular situation?

 Excerpt from the article:

“Trying to suppress hateful speech doesn’t make it go away,” says [Joan Bertin, executive director of the NCAC]. “I mean, I think the whole idea of free speech requires us to be active participants, and when we hear ideas that we think are bad and harmful, it requires us to say ‘why,’ not just say ‘shut up.'”

But publisher Dennis Johnson says another equally important right is at stake here: The right to protest.

“This is not about censoring right wing voices,” he says. “This is about combating hate speech and its entry into the mainstream.”

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February Library Hours

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Winter Break Hours

Current library hours are always on our website

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Have a restful and happy Thanksgiving break

The library will be closed Wed. Nov 23 until we reopen on Sunday 27. Have a wonderful Thanksgiving!

Here at Macdonald-Kelce we are grateful for the wisdom of the many writers, professors, and great minds whose work lives in the stacks of all the world’s libraries. Here’s a quote by Kurt Vonnegut, beloved author, free thinker, humorist and humanist, reflecting on humanity’s gift for love, and the ability to be joyful with what you have:

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“I urge you to please notice when you are happy, and exclaim or murmur or think at some point, ‘If this isn’t nice, I don’t know what is.’” — Kurt Vonnegut, A Man Without a Country, 2007

Censorship Friday: Why many banned books deal with diversity and minorities

alexieThere are books that address the experiences of marginalized groups in the US, books that bring to light the stories of immigrants, of the LGBTQ community, of the Indigenous peoples of the Americas, and other non-white race/ethnicities that make up a significant part of our country. Many of these books, especially YA and children’s’ books, unsettle those who don’t affiliate with these groups. In the article below, the author uses statistics from other recent studies to highlight the fact that diverse books are often targeted for censorship. She points to novels such as Sherman Alexie’s The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, which the library has in the collection (find it on the second floor, PS3551.L35774 A27 2009).

Banned Books Are Often Diverse Books. Check the Stats.

This year’s Banned Books Week theme, diverse books, has been on my mind for some time.  As Jamie LaRue, director of the American Library Association’s (ALA) Office for Intellectual Freedom, has noted, defining diversity is difficult.  However, the definition used by the organization We Need Diverse Books is succinct and inclusive: “We recognize all diverse experiences, including (but not limited to) LGBTQIA, people of color, gender diversity, people with disabilities, and ethnic, cultural, and religious minorities.”

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