Monthly Archives: April 2017

Florida Memory

The State Archives of Florida is the central repository for the records of Florida State Government. The Archives is mandated by law to collect, preserve, and make available for research the records of the State of Florida, as well as private manuscripts, local government records, photographs, and other materials that complement official State records.

Tampa's tobacco industry

Archives are a great resource to find out more information about a particular place, time and communities. They also are a great place to find primary sources. The Florida State Archives have primary source sets to help students and historians learn more about Florida’s history. Click here to explore those primary sources.

African American preachers who protested segregated bus seating - Tallahassee, FloridaSit-in at Woolworth's lunch counter - Tallahassee, Florida

What is a primary source? “In historical research, primary sources are original written or physical items created in the time period being studied.”

To learn more about primary sources check out the University of Tampa’s Research Guide for Primary Sources.

The Florida State Archives provides the public with photograph collections, video and audio recordings, curated collections, exhibits and educational resources for teachers.

Want to use an image in your school project? No problem! Over 200,000 images in the Florida State Archive are copy-right free! Just make sure to give the State Archives of Florida credit in your paper or work.

Click Here to Check out the Florida State Archives

The queen at the Florida Alligator Farm - Jacksonville, Florida

The Global Jukebox

The Global Jukebox is a site based on the audio archive of Alan Lomax, famed ethnomusicologist who collected traditional folk music of cultures around the world. There are many ways to browse: by map, by culture, or by “journeys” where you can track your personal heritage musically and make a family tree of songs.

About the site: “The Global Jukebox presents traditions that are linked to the roots of the world’s peoples. Alan Lomax called it a “democratic cultural system”. The visitor may explore collections of music, dance, and speech from almost every corner of the globe, recorded by hundreds of pioneering ethnographers at times when mass communications were less pervasive than now.

The Global Jukebox explores connections between families of expressive style. One can travel the world of song, dance and language through the Wheel Chart and the Map. Thousands of examples of the world’s music, dance and other expressive behavior will now become available. The Global Jukebox is presented as a free, non-commercial, educational place for everybody, students, educators, scholars, scientists, musicians, dancers, linguists, artists and music fans to explore expressive patterns in their cultural-geographic and diasporic settings and alongside other people’s. By inviting familiarity with many kinds of vocalizing, musicking, moving, and talking, we hope to advance cultural equity and to reconnect people and communities with their creative heritage.”

read more here

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Celebrate Undergraduate Research, April 2017

Learning how to find and do quality research is what the MKLibrary is all about. That’s why we look forward to the annual Undergraduate Research symposium series and the Human Rights Conference, starting this Friday, April 14 through April 28. These presentations highlight the excellent work undergrads have done over the course of the year.

We applaud your work!

Read more about the upcoming events here.

Lost your notebook? Check the Library’s Lost & Found

The busy time of the semester is upon us! If you’re anything like us here at the library, you may find yourself a bit scatterbrained and rushed – a good recipe for misplacing your belongings. If you happen to leave your water bottle, hoodie, or any other personal item in the library, check to see if someone turned it in at our lost and found, located at the Circulation Desk.

Remember, don’t leave any valuables unattended, even when the library seems empty. You always have the option to rent out a locker if you are leaving to get a coffee or go out for lunch. Lockers are available for all day rentals, and are located near the bathrooms. Inquire at Circulation for a locker.