Movies Worth Watching: Annie Hall

1060609I recently saw Annie Hall for the first time and am now completely obsessed with the films of Woody Allen. Annie Hall is emblematic of Allen’s singular perspective and artistic style and was the 1978 Academy Award winner for Best Film, Director (Allen), Actress (Diane Keaton), and Screenplay (Allen and Marshall Brickman). Luckily for me and anyone else interested in becoming better acquainted with the work of Woody Allen the library has several of his films in the DVD collection available for check out. To find a movie search the Online Catalog using the exact title or by author using author last name first name (Allen Woody) and selecting Author Browse.

The library also has a number of books by Woody Allen and books of criticism about the iconic writer/director and his films. Below are a few recommendations but to find more check the Online Catalog.

Lax, EConversations with Woody Allen., & Allen, W. (2009). Conversations with Woody Allen: His films, the movies, and moviemaking. New York: Alfred A. Knopf.

Allen, W. (1975). Without feathers. New York: Random House.

Silet, C. L. P. (2006). The films of Woody Allen: Critical essays. Lanham, Md: Scarecrow Press.

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2 responses to “Movies Worth Watching: Annie Hall

  1. My favorite is Crimes and Misdemeanors.While there’s lot of humor in it, it’s pretty close to the most depressing movie I’ve ever watched.

  2. I really loved Midnight in Paris a few years ago. I could watch that over and over again as I love all the literary references and it makes me laugh and Rachel McAdams plays a perfect LA rich snob that I can’t hate too much. Owen Wilson is great too – he plays a perfect “I just want to be somebody” kind of guy/writer….it resonates with me, I feel like my time is finally here and just want to be somebody’s full time librarian and really “dig in deep some place” and eventually move on to greatness (director perhaps???) one day so that I can mold and manipulate the institution (in a good way of course) the way he wants to mold and manipulate the written word.