Monthly Archives: October 2012

Why is the library so cold?

This question comes up a few times every year so I thought I’d address it on the blog.

First, know that the temperature control devices are not even in the library. Facilities controls the temperature.

Second, this building was built in 1969 when there was less concern about energy efficiency. Changing the way we heat and cool the building would take a prohibitively expensive re-design.

What this means is that it’s difficult to regulate temperature for a large building. Some parts (like the front and center of the first floor) will always be warmer than the less trafficked perimeter (like the study carrels along near the windows on the first and second floor).

“It’s cold in here and I think the air conditioner is running.” Yes. That happens. In order to keep the temperature even sometimes, even in winter, the AC runs to counter-act the the heater. Like I said, this building was built over 40 years ago when energy efficiency was a low priority.

The librarians and library staff are just as cold. My office is on the perimeter of the second floor next to a window. It gets cold in there. Right now it’s a shade above 66 degrees and I’m wearing a jacket. However, to turn up the heat enough to make me comfortable would probably result in temperatures in the high 70s in the most heavily trafficked part of the building. Comfortable for some, but overly warm for most people.

Keep in mind that we’re also controlling the temperature for the books. Books like cool, dry spaces. Heat and humidity shorten a book’s lifespan.

Finally, this is not unique to UT or to the library. I’ve worked in three different academic libraries (as a student, as a staff worker, and as a librarian), studied extensively in two others (as an undergrad and a graduate student) and done extended visits at a half-dozen more (I like to visit libraries when I travel!) and unnatural coldness is a common complaint. Often for the same reasons. The buildings are old and it’s difficult to reconcile the hot parts with the cold parts.

Until we get a new building (and I don’t think there’s any urgency to break ground on a new one any time soon) we’ll all have to remember to bring extra sweaters and jackets while visiting (or working in) the library.

UTWrites: Could I Vote for a Mormon for President? by Dr. Ryan Cragun

Stop by this afternoon as we welcome Dr. Ryan Cragun to talk about his new book Could I Vote for a Mormon for President?

Dr. Cragun will be speaking in the Macdonald-Kelce Library in room AV2 this afternoon from 4pm to 5. Refreshments will be served.

From the publisher’s description: “Mitt Romney is a Mormon, but does that mean he’s a Christian? Does he belong to a cult? Does he wear funny Mormon underwear? These questions and more are answered in this accessible and concise introduction to Mormonism, in which two sociologists of religion take an objective and often humorous look at 2012 presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s beliefs. Geared to voters wondering whether Romney’s Mormon faith should affect their vote, Could I Vote for a Mormon for President? comes at key time for those in search of unbiased information about the candidate and his faith.”

Final in the Series: Your University of Tampa Librarians

Librarian Laura Rounds is one busy person! She is in charge of acquisitions, cataloging, and systems here at the Macdonald-Kelce Library. So, what does that actually mean? Well, acquisitions is just like it sounds, her work involves all the things we acquire here at the library: ordering books, Ebooks, DVDs, etc. Cataloging involves creating access points to all the materials we acquire so you can find them in the online catalog through all the various search types (e.g., keyword, title, author, call number, subject heading, etc.).  Finally, Laura’s work as the systems librarian requires her oversee the management of our integrated library system, which includes the online catalog UTOPIA.  Laura also does reference work – it makes me tired just thinking about all she does!

Now that you know what Laura does at the library, let me tell you how she got here. Laura started her undergraduate experience at Saint Petersburg Junior College (now just known as Saint Petersburg College). She then went on to the University of Florida and earned a Bachelor’s degree in anthropology.

Originally she hoped to become a museum curator but when she entered graduate school at the  University of South Florida it’s  Museum Studies concentration offered via their Applied Archeology program was defunct at that time. Despite promises of revival, after two semesters in the program she was facing having to do a second hot Florida summer archaeological dig, plus a thesis, and she still hadn’t had any courses in her chosen area. So, she decided to switch to Library Science where she now curates, books, DVDs, and realia (Librarian Elizabeth Barron makes sure she never has a shortage of hand puppets and board games to catalog).

Laura loves the variety of work she can accomplish here at UT. Additionally, she loves the fact that UT isn’t too big and it offers a great opportunity to test and implement new improvements since we aren’t bogged down by layers of bureaucracy the way larger institutions often are.

Laura encourages students to have a long-range plan, figure out what you want to do in life, and do what it takes to get there fast.

She is also an avid dog trainer with over twenty-five years of experience in all areas of competitive training and has appeared on television and film with her Australian Shepherds.

Finally, Laura reminds everyone to take advantage of the natural beauty in the area while it is still here to enjoy.

Laura can be found on the reference desk on Friday mornings.

AND to wrap things up…the other two librarians you will more than likely see around are Jeanne Vance and Mickey Wells. Both have a varied schedule but can usually be found on the reference desk most week days.

I hope you have enjoyed reading about your University of Tampa librarians. Always let us know how we can help you succeed during your time at UT.

UTWrites: Could I Vote for a Mormon for President? by Dr. Ryan Cragun

Join us next Tuesday as we welcome Dr. Ryan Cragun to talk about his new book Could I Vote for a Mormon for President?

Dr. Cragun will be speaking in the Macdonald-Kelce Library in room AV2, Tuesday, October 30, from 4pm to 5. Refreshments will be served.

From the publisher’s description: “Mitt Romney is a Mormon, but does that mean he’s a Christian? Does he belong to a cult? Does he wear funny Mormon underwear? These questions and more are answered in this accessible and concise introduction to Mormonism, in which two sociologists of religion take an objective and often humorous look at 2012 presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s beliefs. Geared to voters wondering whether Romney’s Mormon faith should affect their vote, Could I Vote for a Mormon for President? comes at key time for those in search of unbiased information about the candidate and his faith.”

Thank You!

Thanks to everyone who came out to hear Professor Kerstein talk about his new book, Key West on the Edge: Inventing the Conch Republic.

Your University of Tampa Librarians: Part IV

[The series continues….] Today I would like introduce to you to Art Bagley. Art, like the rest of us, is a reference librarian. But, Art also is in charge of the Macdonald-Kelce Library’s Special Collections and Archives. Art knows a lot about the history of UT and Tampa in general. If you have a question about articles found in old copies of the Minaret or want to look at old yearbooks you need to find Art. Art has been a librarian for twenty-five years – all at UT!

Art has a bachelor’s degree in American history from Florida State University.  For awhile he worked for the state of Florida as Graphic Artist/Typographer/Editor. As time progressed he decided he wanted more than just a vocation, he wanted a career. Art returned to FSU and earned a Master’s degree in Library Science so that he could embark on a career involving the exploration of what he describes as “a vast sea of information, education, and entertainment.”

Art loves the variety of research projects/papers students always bring to the reference desk. The academic atmosphere challenges him to learn, to be aware, and to communicate with students.

Think things through — that is a bit of advice from Art. Whether this be about life decisions, course projects, etc. he sees no real reason to rush into a situation unless it’s an exercise in extemporaneous thinking or an actual emergency.

Art has a few more bits of wisdom to share: build your vocabulary (do crossword puzzles), do a good deed daily, volunteer to assist the less fortunate, look out for the other driver on the road, and never miss an opportunity to keep your mouth shut.

Art can be found on the reference desk most mornings on Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday during the fall semester. Stop by and say “Hi.”

New Arrivals: Women in Politics and Medicare, The Current Controversies Series

 

 

 

 

 

An assignment that frequently brings students into the library involves researching a controversial topic and presenting either a pro or con position. Current Controversies is an anthology series that explores a variety of such topics ranging from police brutality, assisted suicide, to alternative energy.  According to the publisher’s fact sheet:

“The series expertly introduces the reader to all sides of contemporary controversies in an objective and comprehensive way. Each anthology is composed of a wide spectrum of primary sources written by many of the foremost authorities in their respective fields; the authors represent leading conservative, liberal, and centrist views. This unique approach provides readers with a concise view of divergent opinions on each topic. Extensive book and periodical bibliographies and a list of organizations to contact are also included.”

To find out which issues the library has in the series search the library’s catalog. Go to utopia.ut.edu and follow the Online Catalog link. Search for “current controversies” using a Keyword Relevance Search and the Quick Limit function to restrict the search to Main. Limiting your search to Main will restrict the results to only those items located in the Main section on the 2nd floor of the library where the majority of non-reference books, both fiction and nonfiction, are located.

See this Reference Question of the Week post about finding information on controversial issues.

New Arrivals: Advertising and Societies: Global Issues, second edition

Advertising and Societies: Global Issues is a valuable resource for students, scholars, and practitioners.  Gender, race, and children are some of the categories used to analyze international advertising. The authors further examine global advertising as it relates to cultural, economic, political, and regulatory issues. The text contains an abundance of illustrative examples, supportive data, and extensive references.

From the Publishers Description: Now in its second edition, Advertising and Societies: Global Issues provides an international perspective on the practice of advertising while examining some of the ethical and social ramifications of advertising in global societies. The book illustrates how issues such as the representation of women and minorities in ads, advertising and children, and advertising in the digital era have relevance to a wider global community. This new edition has been updated to reflect the dramatic changes impacting the field of advertising that have taken place since publication of the first edition. The growing importance of emerging markets is discussed, and new photos are included. The book provides students and scholars with a comprehensive review of the literature on advertising and society and uses practical examples from international media to document how global advertising and global consumer culture operate, making it an indispensable research tool and invaluable for classroom use.

UTWrites: Dr. Robert Kerstein talks about his new book Key West on the Edge: Inventing the Conch Republic

We hope you can make it by the library next Tuesday, October 23 to hear Professor Robert Kerstein talk about his new book Key West on the Edge: Inventing the Conch Republic.

The talk will be from 4pm to 5pm in AV2. Food and drinks will be served.

“Key West is an island steeped in lore, from Hemingway to Fantasy Fest, but behind the façade of Margaritaville lie buried tensions and conflicts in need of examination. Kerstein provides a much-needed dose of reality in the form of a masterfully researched study of the island’s tourism industry, from the shadowy power brokers who pull the strings to the underpaid workers who serve the drinks. From seedy bars to trendy discos, Kerstein has managed to capture the improbable mixture of this strange island, while offering a cautionary tale of tourism run amok.”\”—Robert Lee Irby, author of 7,000 Clams

LBGT History Month

October is LGBT History Month. First established in 1994, this month long celebration commemorates the history, heritage and accomplishments of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals. To honor the history and contributions of individuals in the LBGT community the library is currently displaying a selection of fiction, nonfiction, and films.

To learn more visit lbgthistorymonth.org

If you are interesting in exploring LGBT studies further the library has a Subject Portal to assist in finding databases and quality internet sources for your research.  You can access the subject portals through the library’s homepage at utopia.ut.edu and click on the Subject Portal link located under Collections.