The myth of online privacy: if you are on social media, consider yourself exposed

Do any of you remember Friendster? Of course you don’t. I’m an “old,” so I have fond memories of being apart of one of the first large-scale social networking platforms that began in the early aughts. Friendster and MySpace are now defunct, or close to it, replaced by a dozen other social sites, with Facebook as the reigning champion with over one billion accounts worldwide. My old Friendster account is archived online and can be analyzed in a variety of ways, just as yours is today.

As a college student in 2017, you are probably apart of at least one of these social networking sites. You may think your profile is fully private (please adjust your settings if it’s wide open – employers can and will look you up!), but the truth is that if you have friends online, certain kinds of information about you can be gathered, even if you aren’t on Snapchat or IG.

If you’re interested in media studies and would like to write about “social media” as a contemporary phenomenon, consider privacy issues. Read the article below and see what you think.

On social media, privacy is no longer a personal choice

Social networks can make predictions about people, based on information from their friends

……..“It’s a good illustration of an issue we have in society, which is that we no longer have control over what people can infer about us,” says Elena Zheleva, a computer scientist at the University of Illinois in Chicago. “If I decide not to participate in a certain social network, that doesn’t mean that people won’t be able to find things about me on that network.”

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Free Music Archive

Looking for free music to enhance your creative projects? The Free Music Archive has thousands of high-quality, legal music recordings that are available for downloading. Directed by the radio station WMFU, the Free Music Archive is a platform for collaboration between curators and artists, including radio stations, podcasts, netlabels, venues, artist collectives, museums, music festivals and more.

The site uses Creative Commons copyright. This gives users the legal and technological framework fto incorporate the material into their creative projects or for personal use. Click Here to Learn More about Creative Commons

Click Here to Access the Free Music Archive

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Writing Center Schedule

Need some extra assistance with your research paper? Not so great at the grammar or splelling? Don’t hand in that paper riddled with mistakes and lazy arguments. The Writing Center is here to help! Here’s their Fall Semester Schedule:

Fall 2017 SWC hours

 

Institutional Repository

The Macdonald-Kelce Library now has a new Institutional Repository (IR) online! The UT IR mission is to collect, preserve, and distribute the intellectual output of the UT community. Many universities have an IR in order to store and preserve materials such as theses, dissertations, university publications, faculty papers, conference proceedings, and college events, and make them accessible to the world.

What you’ll find now in the IR is a collection of past MFA Theses (most are campus-access restricted), and materials from a conference hosted here at UT.

In the future the Library hopes to collect more scholarship created by you, whether you are a student, faculty, or staff. Keep up with the progress of the IR by visiting the library’s homepage at utopia.ut.edu, and reading this blog!

Learn more about the IR on our guide: http://libguides.utopia.ut.edu/thesis

Explore the IR here: https://utampa.dspacedirect.org/

 

 

Accessing NYT Online

In addition to finding archived editions of the New York Times in our Databases, the Macdonald-Kelce Library now has a subscription to the NYT Online. This subscription allows you free and unlimited access to the website content.

Here’s how to access in 3 easy steps:

1Navigate to Accessnyt.com (while connected to the IP/campus network) 

2. Type in “University of Tampa” under Find School…

3. Click Create Account and complete the registration fields (use your UT email for this account). This will allow access from everywhere in the world. After you have registered, go to www.nytimes.com and click on the login tab in the upper right hand corner of the page to login.

The library also offers NYT daily in print. Ask a librarian for help or for more information.

Welcome to the Library – Fall 2017 edition

Hello UT!

Are you ready for the new semester? Whether you’re brand-new to campus or a seasoned veteran, we hope you stop by the library to say hello, ask questions, and have a look around if this is your first time here.

Librarians at the reference desk are here to help you. There’s a lot of information on our website, but here is a good place to start: the About the Macdonald-Kelce Library guide. On this guide, you’ll find all of our policies, helpful tips, and fast facts about how to use the library. TLDR: check out the FAQ guide.

This blog you are reading now has answers to many of your questions. Take a look at the links on the left. Still have questions? Visit us at Circulation or the Reference Desk, email library@ut.edu, or give us a call 813 253 6231.

Welcome. See you in the library!

Summer Movie Reel Research: Detroit

Out of all the summer blockbusters, the movie Detroit has a special historical significance. This year is the 50th Anniversary of the 1967 Detroit Riots. The movie focuses on the incident at the Algiers Motel that resulted in the murder of three black men and nine other people brutally beaten by the Detroit police, Michigan State Troopers, National Guardsmen, and private guards.

Detroit Riots

The bodies of three shooting victims are removed from the Algiers Motel in midtown Detroit, July 26, 1967. The three black men were found shot to death in a room of the motel. It was determined if they were victims of snipers who were active during the throughout the riot-torn city at night. (AP Photo)

The book that inspired the movie Detroit was written by John Hersey and is available for checkout at the University of Tampa Library.

It’s located on the second floor of the library, call number F574.D4 H4 1968

The 1967 Detroit Riots lasted from July 23rd to July 27th. It began with the police raiding an unlicensed bar called the Blind Pig and escalated into one of the deadliest and most destructive riots in U. S. history.  Below are some resources from the University of Michigan and a link to a collection of photographs from the Associated Press, The Ann Arbor News and The Jackson Citizen Patriot.

Detroit 1967 Riot’s Quick Statistics

Deaths: 43

Injuries: 1,189

Damages: $287 million and $323 million.

Arrests: 7,231

Stores looted or burned: 2,509

Click Here to view more  Quick Facts courtesy of the University of Michigan

Listen to Testimonies from people who survived the Riots

Click Here to listen to a testimony from a child who lived through the riots

Click Here to listen to a testimony from a looter who lived through  the riots

View Archival Photographs of the 1967 Riots

These photographs are courtesy of the Associated Press, The Ann Arbor News and The Jackson Citizen Patriot. Click Here to view more photographs

MFA Lectores series begins Thursday June 15

There’s an exciting line up of writers this summer. Don’t miss it!
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Summer Hours

The Macdonald-Kelce Library will be open this summer during the hours of 8AM – 10PM Monday – Thursday, 11AM – 7PM on Saturday. In May, the library will close at 9PM: please check variable hours on the homepage under “Hours.”

Stay cool and happy summer!

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Finals home stretch

We know that you’re studying hard in these last few days of finals (the library has been packed!). Following the end of the semester library tradition, we’ve put out a table filled with puzzles, stress balls, and candy. Stop by if you haven’t yet to study or say hello.

Taking a May term class? If you need the library after Finals Week our hours are always posted online.

We hope you all have a happy summer and special congratulations to the graduating class of Spring 2017!

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