Summer Movie Reel Research: Detroit

Out of all the summer blockbusters, the movie Detroit has a special historical significance. This year is the 50th Anniversary of the 1967 Detroit Riots. The movie focuses on the incident at the Algiers Motel that resulted in the murder of three black men and nine other people brutally beaten by the Detroit police, Michigan State Troopers, National Guardsmen, and private guards.

Detroit Riots

The bodies of three shooting victims are removed from the Algiers Motel in midtown Detroit, July 26, 1967. The three black men were found shot to death in a room of the motel. It was determined if they were victims of snipers who were active during the throughout the riot-torn city at night. (AP Photo)

The book that inspired the movie Detroit was written by John Hersey and is available for checkout at the University of Tampa Library.

It’s located on the second floor of the library, call number F574.D4 H4 1968

The 1967 Detroit Riots lasted from July 23rd to July 27th. It began with the police raiding an unlicensed bar called the Blind Pig and escalated into one of the deadliest and most destructive riots in U. S. history.  Below are some resources from the University of Michigan and a link to a collection of photographs from the Associated Press, The Ann Arbor News and The Jackson Citizen Patriot.

Detroit 1967 Riot’s Quick Statistics

Deaths: 43

Injuries: 1,189

Damages: $287 million and $323 million.

Arrests: 7,231

Stores looted or burned: 2,509

Click Here to view more  Quick Facts courtesy of the University of Michigan

Listen to Testimonies from people who survived the Riots

Click Here to listen to a testimony from a child who lived through the riots

Click Here to listen to a testimony from a looter who lived through  the riots

View Archival Photographs of the 1967 Riots

These photographs are courtesy of the Associated Press, The Ann Arbor News and The Jackson Citizen Patriot. Click Here to view more photographs

MFA Lectores series begins Thursday June 15

There’s an exciting line up of writers this summer. Don’t miss it!
LectoresJune2017_Page_1
LectoresJune2017_Page_2.jpg
LectoresJune2017_Page_3.jpg

Summer Hours

The Macdonald-Kelce Library will be open this summer during the hours of 8AM – 10PM Monday – Thursday, 11AM – 7PM on Saturday. In May, the library will close at 9PM: please check variable hours on the homepage under “Hours.”

Stay cool and happy summer!

maxresdefault

Finals home stretch

We know that you’re studying hard in these last few days of finals (the library has been packed!). Following the end of the semester library tradition, we’ve put out a table filled with puzzles, stress balls, and candy. Stop by if you haven’t yet to study or say hello.

Taking a May term class? If you need the library after Finals Week our hours are always posted online.

We hope you all have a happy summer and special congratulations to the graduating class of Spring 2017!

File_000

Florida Memory

The State Archives of Florida is the central repository for the records of Florida State Government. The Archives is mandated by law to collect, preserve, and make available for research the records of the State of Florida, as well as private manuscripts, local government records, photographs, and other materials that complement official State records.

Tampa's tobacco industry

Archives are a great resource to find out more information about a particular place, time and communities. They also are a great place to find primary sources. The Florida State Archives have primary source sets to help students and historians learn more about Florida’s history. Click here to explore those primary sources.

African American preachers who protested segregated bus seating - Tallahassee, FloridaSit-in at Woolworth's lunch counter - Tallahassee, Florida

What is a primary source? “In historical research, primary sources are original written or physical items created in the time period being studied.”

To learn more about primary sources check out the University of Tampa’s Research Guide for Primary Sources.

The Florida State Archives provides the public with photograph collections, video and audio recordings, curated collections, exhibits and educational resources for teachers.

Want to use an image in your school project? No problem! Over 200,000 images in the Florida State Archive are copy-right free! Just make sure to give the State Archives of Florida credit in your paper or work.

Click Here to Check out the Florida State Archives

The queen at the Florida Alligator Farm - Jacksonville, Florida

The Global Jukebox

The Global Jukebox is a site based on the audio archive of Alan Lomax, famed ethnomusicologist who collected traditional folk music of cultures around the world. There are many ways to browse: by map, by culture, or by “journeys” where you can track your personal heritage musically and make a family tree of songs.

About the site: “The Global Jukebox presents traditions that are linked to the roots of the world’s peoples. Alan Lomax called it a “democratic cultural system”. The visitor may explore collections of music, dance, and speech from almost every corner of the globe, recorded by hundreds of pioneering ethnographers at times when mass communications were less pervasive than now.

The Global Jukebox explores connections between families of expressive style. One can travel the world of song, dance and language through the Wheel Chart and the Map. Thousands of examples of the world’s music, dance and other expressive behavior will now become available. The Global Jukebox is presented as a free, non-commercial, educational place for everybody, students, educators, scholars, scientists, musicians, dancers, linguists, artists and music fans to explore expressive patterns in their cultural-geographic and diasporic settings and alongside other people’s. By inviting familiarity with many kinds of vocalizing, musicking, moving, and talking, we hope to advance cultural equity and to reconnect people and communities with their creative heritage.”

read more here

Screen Shot 2017-04-20 at 11.18.57 AM

Celebrate Undergraduate Research, April 2017

Learning how to find and do quality research is what the MKLibrary is all about. That’s why we look forward to the annual Undergraduate Research symposium series and the Human Rights Conference, starting this Friday, April 14 through April 28. These presentations highlight the excellent work undergrads have done over the course of the year.

We applaud your work!

Read more about the upcoming events here.

Lost your notebook? Check the Library’s Lost & Found

The busy time of the semester is upon us! If you’re anything like us here at the library, you may find yourself a bit scatterbrained and rushed – a good recipe for misplacing your belongings. If you happen to leave your water bottle, hoodie, or any other personal item in the library, check to see if someone turned it in at our lost and found, located at the Circulation Desk.

Remember, don’t leave any valuables unattended, even when the library seems empty. You always have the option to rent out a locker if you are leaving to get a coffee or go out for lunch. Lockers are available for all day rentals, and are located near the bathrooms. Inquire at Circulation for a locker.

UTWrites, Tues. April 4 with Shane Hinton

Join us for a reading by English Professor Shane Hinton next Tuesday at 6PM, Macdonald-Kelce Library room AV2. This UTWrites event is free and open to the public, and refreshments will be served.

ShaneHinton

Image

UT TED Talk: Predatory Publishing, Panel Presentation

March 29th Predatory Publishing.jpg